Digital

Salt road creates digital platforms for artists working with archives on social change, protest, surveillance and nature to enable artists and communities to create contemporary artworks and relational practice. We are working with academic and private sector partners to develop new interactive technology solutions incorporating augmented reality, projection mapping, touch screen and motion capture technologies.

We worked with the software coder artist John Sear  and the Digital Humanities Hub at the University of Birmingham to create a touch screen app that developed the University’s ERDF funded digital table top archive work. The Hub across the Arts and Humanities with cultural and heritage organisations, digital and creative industries and academics to develop collaborative and innovative digital prototypes. Salt road co-created the Diptych (historically a work consisting of two painted or carved panels that are hinged together) maker app which allows participants to curate and edit their own art work responses to digital archive material.

We launched our touchscreen prototype app at the Ikon gallery and in partnership with MozFest and the Being Human Festival for a series of projections onto Senate House, School of advance Studies University of London.

Salt road in partnership with Orangeleaf Systems, the School of Advanced Study University of London and the Keep at Sussex University commissioned 8 digital visual artists and programmers to hack archives of the Mass Observation social research organisation, the Mass Observation project and the Ministry of Information. Audience members and workshop participants completed anonymous sample survey forms.

Commissioned artists worked with programmers and archivists to make new work in response to data held at the Mass Observation Archive at Sussex University and related archives. The artworks will be exhibited as digital installations and projections for the University of London’s School of Advanced Study’s Being Human Festival 15th-23rd November 2014. The festival is organised by the School in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.